Science

SCIENCE 10

Summary of Course Content and Activities

Science 10 is a brief look into 4 sciences: chemistry, biology, physics and earth science.
Activities include: reading, practice problems, quizzes, tests and virtual labs.

Philosophy statement for teaching this course

Science 10 provides the foundation in science that creates opportunities for them to pursue progressively higher levels of study, prepares them for science-related occupations. Students are introduced to the physical, biological, and chemical components of science. Science 10 provides students with opportunities to explore, analyze and appreciate the interrelationships among science, technology, society and the environment, and to develop understandings that will affect their personal lives, their careers and their futures.

Prerequisites

A mark of 50% or better in Science 9

Materials and Resources

Provided by NSA

  • Addison Wesley Science 10 by Pearson

Purchased by Students

  • A scientific calculator is required for this course.
  • notebook for pencil and paper assignments.

Forecasted amount of time required to complete each week's lesson

7-8 hours per week

Description of student evaluations, quizzes and tests.

  • For each unit Assignments 60%
  • Quizzes 10%
  • Tests 30%

The units are worth 70% of your final mark and the Final Exam is 30%

CHEMISTRY

CHEMISTRY 20

Summary of course content and activities:

Course Topics:

  • Unit 1: Matter as Solutions, Acids, Bases and Gases, Chapters 1-6
  • Unit 2: Quantitative Relationships in Chemical Changes, Chapter 7
  • Unit 3: Chemical Bonding in Matter, Chapter 8
  • Unit 4: The Diversity of Matter: An Intro to Organic Chemistry, Chapter 9

Philosophy statement for and/or behind teaching this course:

Chemistry is the study of matter and its changes. Through the study of chemistry, you are given an opportunity to explore and understand the natural world and to become aware of the profound influence of chemistry in your everyday life.

Pre-requisite(s):

A mark of 50% or better in Science 10

Number of credits that this course is worth:

5 credits

Materials and resources provided by NSA, purchased by student, and/or recommended:

Provided by NSA:

  • Nelson Chemistry by F. Jenkins et al., 1993

Purchased by student:

  • A scientific calculator is required for this course.

Recommended but not required:

  • Optional: Molecular Model Set

Forecasted amount of time required to complete each week's lesson

7-8 hours per week

Description of student evaluations, quizzes and tests.

  • For each unit: Unit Work 70%
    • Unit Exam 30%
    • Overall: Course work 60%
    • Midterm 10%
  • Final exam 30%

CHEMISTRY 30

Summary of Course Content and Activities

In Chemistry 30 we study change--changes in thermochemical energy, elerctrochemical systems and in acid and base equilibrium. We also study hydrocarbons--their sources, how to name them and simple reactions with them.
Activities include: reading, practice problems, quizzes, tests and virtual labs.

Philosophy statement for teaching this course

Chemistry is a discovery about how and why elements interact and combine in the world. As Christians, we have been created to ?rule?over the all the earth? (Genesis 1:26). We can serve God more effectively as His caretakers when we learn about His creation and the rules that govern it.

Prerequisites

A mark of 50% or better (65% or better recommended) in Chemistry 20

Materials and Resources

Provided by NSA

  • Nelson Chemistry by F. Jenkins et al., 2007a
  • The Key Workbook

Purchased by Students

  • A scientific calculator is required for this course.
  • Optional: Molecular Model Set
  • notebook for pencil and paper assignments.

Forecasted amount of time required to complete each week's lesson

8-10 hours per week

Description of student evaluations, quizzes and tests.

In Class Work

  • Assignments 35%
  • Exams 15%
  • Diploma Exam 50%

PHYSICS

PHYSICS 20

Summary of Course Content and Activities

Physics 20 is the first course in the Physics 20-30 sequence.
This course includes the following strands:

  •     Kinematics: the science of motion
  •     Dynamics: the study of forces and the cause of motion
  •     Circular Motion, Work and Energy
  •     Oscillatory Motion and Mechanical Waves

Philosophy statement for teaching this course

Physics is the study of both matter and energy, as well as their interactions. Through its study learners are given opportunities to both explore and comprehend the natural world as God created it. They are also given opportunities to make themselves aware of the profound influence Physics has on self, society and the environment.

Understanding that learning proceeds best when it originates from a base of what the learner already knows, deems personally useful and considered relevant, this course presents (as often as possible) its learning objectives from a base of concrete experiences and from a solid Biblical perspective. As an experimental discipline, the study of Physics will promote higher level thinking and problem solving alongside both creativity and imagination.

Students taking Physics 20 are presumed to have reached the acceptable standard or better in both Science 10 and Mathematics 10.

Materials and Resources

Provided by NSA

  • Pearson Physics

Purchased by Students

  • Microsoft Office 97 (or greater) especially Word and Excel
  • Scientific Calculator (or approved graphing calculator)
  • Bible

Forecasted amount of time required to complete each week's lesson

Semester students can expect to complete the course in about 8 hours per week over eighteen weeks. Full year students will complete the course in about 4 hours per week over thirty-six weeks.

Description of student evaluations, quizzes and tests.

For semester courses, there are two major grading periods, while for full year courses there are four major grading periods, one after each quarter.

There are four major grading periods, one after each quarter. Assignment Check-ins will make up 30% of your final grade, completion of the group discussions and the self-check
assignments another 10%, your Reflections and Take Away Journal responses 30%, and finally tests and quizzes making up 15%.


There will also be a final exam at the end of this course that will
make up the last 15% of your final course grade.

PHYSICS 30

Summary of Course Content and Activities

Physics 30 is the second course in the Physics 20-30 sequence.
This course includes the following strands:

  • Momentum and Impulse: A look at the movement of objects both before and after a collision.
  • Forces and Fields: The study of both electric and magnetic forces and fields.
  • Electromagnetic Radiation: A look at light, its properties and theories behind it, both past and present. This unit will include an introduction to Quantum Mechanics
  • Atomic Physics: The exploration of the atom and its particles.

Philosophy statement for teaching this course

Physics is the study of both matter and energy, as well as their interactions. Through its study learners are given opportunities to both explore and comprehend the natural world as God created it. They are also given opportunities to make themselves aware of the profound influence Physics has on self, society and the environment.

Understanding that learning proceeds best when it originates from a base of what the learner already knows, deems personally useful and considered relevant, this course presents (as often as possible) its learning objectives from a base of concrete experiences and from a solid Biblical perspective. As an experimental discipline, the study of Physics will promote higher level thinking and problem solving alongside both creativity and imagination.

Prerequisites

Students taking Physics 30 are presumed to have reached the acceptable standard or better in both Physics 20 and Mathematics 20.

Materials and Resources

Provided by NSA

  • Pearson Physics

Purchased by Students

  • Microsoft Office 97 (or greater) especially Word and Excel
  • Scientific Calculator (or approved graphing calculator)
  • Bible
  • Optional: The Key - Physics 30

Forecasted amount of time required to complete each week's lesson

Semester students can expect to complete the course in about 8 hours per week over eighteen weeks. Full year students will complete the course in about 4 hours per week over thirty-six weeks.

Description of student evaluations, quizzes and tests.

For semester courses, there are two major grading periods, while for full year courses there are four major grading periods, one after each quarter.

Assignment check-ins will make up 35% of your final grade, completion of the group discussions and self-check assignments another 10%, your Equations are Guides to Thinking Journal 35% and finally, tests and quizzes make up the last 20%.

Please note: There will be a diploma exam at the end of this course, therefore your final mark will be assigned as follows - Final Mark = 70% School Awarded Mark + 30% Diploma Exam Mark

BIOLOGY

BIOLOGY 20

Summary of Course Content and Activities

Biology 20 is the first course in the Biology 20-30 sequence.

This course includes the following strands:

  • Energy and Matter Exchange in the Biosphere: An exploration of Earth's cycles and nature's dependence on them.
  • Ecosystems and Population Change: Including a study of the Creation/Evolution debate.
  • Photosynthesis and Cellular Respiration: A indepth look at the processes of energy production in plants, animals and humans.
  • Human Systems: A study of the digestive, respiratory, excretory and circulatory systems.

Students will also participate in a on-line, virtual pig dissection.

Philosophy statement for teaching this course

Biology is the study of life and living systems from the molecular level to the biosphere. Through the study of Biology learners are given an opportunity to explore and understand the natural world that God created. They are made aware of the profound influence of Biology in their lives. Relating the study of Biology to what the learners already know, deem personally useful and consider relevant, facitilitates learning. Learning proceeds best when it originates from a base of concrete experiences that present an authentic view of Biology within the larger context of science and technology. In Biology 20-30, students learn Biology in relevant contexts and are encouraged to engage in its content from a Biblical perspective. Students are also encouraged to appreciate it as a scientific endeavor with practical impacts not only on their own lives, but also on the larger contexts of society, environment and economy.

Prerequisites

Students taking Biology 20 are presumed to have reached the acceptable standard or better in Science 10.

Materials and Resources

Provided by NSA

  • Nelson Biology: Alberta 20 - 30
  • Access to Nelson's Student Web Centre

Purchased by Students

  • Microsoft Office 97 (or greater) especially Word and Excel
  • Scientific Calculator (approved graphing calculator is acceptable)
  • Bible

Forecasted amount of time required to complete each week's lesson

Semester students can expect to complete the course in about 6 hours per week over eighteen weeks. Full year students will complete the course in about 3 hours per week over thirty-six weeks.

Description of student evaluations, quizzes and tests.

For semester courses, there are two major grading periods, while for full year courses there are four major grading periods, one after each quarter. Assignments will make up 35% of your final grade, participation in group discussions another 10%, your I Can Objective Journal 20% and finally tests and quizzes making up 20%.
There will also be a final exam at the end of this course that will make up the last 15% of your final course grade.

BIOLOGY 30

Summary of Course Content and Activities

Biology 30 is the second course in the Biology 20-30 sequence.
This course includes the following strands:

  • The Nervous and Endocrine Systems: A look at both their structure and fuction, especially as they help to maintain equilibrium.
  • Reproduction and Development: A study of both hormone control and pregnancy.
  • Cell Division, Genetics and Molecular Biology: A detailed study of the processes involved in genetic inheritance.
  • Populaiton and Community Dynamics: A look at the factors influencing gene pool and population composition.

Philosophy statement for teaching this course

Biology is the study of life and living systems from the molecular level to the biosphere. Through the study of Biology learners are given an opportunity to explore and understand the natural world that God created. They are made aware of the profound influence of Biology in their lives. Relating the study of Biology to what the learners already know, deem personally useful and consider relevant, facitilitates learning. Learning proceeds best when it originates from a base of concrete experiences that present an authentic view of Biology within the larger context of science and technology. In Biology 20-30, students learn Biology in relevant contexts and are encouraged to engage in its content from a Biblical perspective. Students are also encouraged to appreciate it as a scientific endeavor with practical impacts not only on their own lives, but also on the larger contexts of society, environment and economy.

Prerequisites

Students taking Biology 30 are presumed to have reached the acceptable standard or better in Biology 20.

Materials and Resources

Provided by NSA

  • Nelson Biology: Alberta 20 - 30
  • Access to Nelson's Student Web Centre

Purchased by Students

  • Microsoft Office 97 (or greater) especially Word and Excel
  • Scientific Calculator (approved graphing calculator is acceptable)
  • Bible

Forecasted amount of time required to complete each week's lesson

Semester students can expect to complete the course in about 8 hours per week over eighteen weeks. Full year students will complete the course in about 4 hours per week over thirty-six weeks.

Description of student evaluations, quizzes and tests.

For semester courses, there are two major grading periods, while for full year courses there are four major grading periods, one after each quarter. Assignments will make up 30% of your final grade, participation in group discussions another 10%, your I Can Objective Journal 30% with tests and quizzes making up the last 30%.
Please note: There will be a diploma exam at the end of this course, therefore your final mark will be assigned as follows -
Final Mark = 50% School Awarded Mark + 50% Diploma Exam Mark