High School Core Courses

ENGLISH 10

ENGLISH 10-1

Summary of course content and activities:

In English 10, the study of World Literature is used to examine structure and style (e.g. usage, diction, and character development) in writing, world view and Christian World view. This will include the study of a sampling of poetry, short stories, essays, plays and novels from various world backgrounds. We will be looking at the culture, the values, the assumptions, and contexts surrounding each of the pieces of literature. With each lesson, we will first examine the author to learn more about his or her own background so that we can better understand and interpret his/her work.

Some specific resources we use are My Family and Other Animals by Gerald Durrell, Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes, and Les Miserables by Victor Hugo.

Philosophy statement for and/or behind teaching this course:

To many people literature is reading. Reading; however, is not literature: it is simply the process through which we experience literature. Literature is a gift from God. Through literature God enables man to communicate, not only his experiences but also his ideas, feelings, and beliefs. We should not merely read literature to escape from the world. Rather we should use literature as a vehicle to encounter the world. Literature can put us face to face with man in his world - man that acts both in ways pleasing to God and in ways displeasing to God. Literature can help us to know more about creation, our fellow man, God, and ourselves. Good literature causes us to think.

Pre-requisite(s):

Language Arts 9

Materials and resources provided by NSA, purchased by student, and/or recommended:

Provided by NSA:

  • The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho
  • Les Miserables by Victor Hugo
  • Julius Caesar by WIlliam Shakespeare DVD

Recommended but not required:

  • Hard copy Dictionary and Thesaurus

Forecasted amount of time required to complete each week's lesson:

4-6 hours (In a regular school, you would have 6.7 hours of class time a week plus the time to do your homework. In a high school English class that could easily be 1-2 hours of homework a night. That's another 5-10 hours a week. This is for a one-semester English course, so divide the total 12-17 hours in half for a whole semester course and it would be 6-9 hours per week) So, if you are spending 4-6 hours each week on a lesson, you are doing great!

Description of student evaluations, quizzes, and tests:

There are four major grading periods, one after quarter. Exams and essays are weighted more heavily than regular assignments.

Additional activities:

Participation in the group discussions is mandatory and calculated as part of the course grade.


ENGLISH 10-2

Summary of course content and activities:

In English 10, the study of World Literature is used to examine structure and style (e.g. usage, diction, and character development) in writing, world view and Christian World view. This will include the study of a sampling of poetry, short stories, essays, plays and novels from various world backgrounds. We will be looking at the culture, the values, the assumptions, and contexts surrounding each of the pieces of literature. 

Some specific resources we use are Goodbye Marianne by Kirstein Watts, Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes, and The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho.

Philosophy statement for and/or behind teaching this course:

To many people literature is reading. Reading; however, is not literature: it is simply the process through which we experience literature. Literature is a gift from God. Through literature God enables man to communicate, not only his experiences but also his ideas, feelings, and beliefs. We should not merely read literature to escape from the world. Rather we should use literature as a vehicle to encounter the world. Literature can put us face to face with man in his world - man that acts both in ways pleasing to God and in ways displeasing to God. Literature can help us to know more about creation, our fellow man, God, and ourselves. Good literature causes us to think.

Pre-requisite(s):

Language Arts 9

Materials and resources provided by NSA, purchased by student, and/or recommended:

Provided by NSA:

  • Film Study: Fly Away Home
  • Goodbye Marianne 
  • The Alchemist
  • Various e-text readings provided with the lessons
  • A thesaurus ( online is ok)
  • English Language Arts Handbook for Students (available online)

Forecasted amount of time required to complete each week's lesson:

4-6 hours per week

Description of student evaluations, quizzes, and tests:

There are four major grading periods, one after quarter. Exams and essays are weighted more heavily than regular assignments.

Additional activities:

Participation in the group discussions is mandatory and calculated aENGLISH 10-1

Summary of course content and activities:

In English 10, the study of World Literature is used to examine structure and style (e.g. usage, diction, and character development) in writing, world view and Christian World view. This will include the study of a sampling of poetry, short stories, essays, plays and novels from various world backgrounds. We will be looking at the culture, the values, the assumptions, and contexts surrounding each of the pieces of literature. With each lesson, we will first examine the author to learn more about his or her own background so that we can better understand and interpret his/her work.

Some specific resources we use are My Family and Other Animals by Gerald Durrell, Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes, and Les Miserables by Victor Hugo.

Philosophy statement for and/or behind teaching this course:

To many people literature is reading. Reading; however, is not literature: it is simply the process through which we experience literature. Literature is a gift from God. Through literature God enables man to communicate, not only his experiences but also his ideas, feelings, and beliefs. We should not merely read literature to escape from the world. Rather we should use literature as a vehicle to encounter the world. Literature can put us face to face with man in his world - man that acts both in ways pleasing to God and in ways displeasing to God. Literature can help us to know more about creation, our fellow man, God, and ourselves. Good literature causes us to think.

Pre-requisite(s):

Language Arts 9

Materials and resources provided by NSA, purchased by student, and/or recommended:

Provided by NSA:

  • To Kill a Mocking Bird by Harper Lee
  • Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare video
  • Les Miserables by Victor Hugo
  • NSA Resource Disk with Dictionary and Literary Terms Glossary
  • Various e-text readings provided with the lessons
  • A Canadian Writer's Reference 4th Edition by Diana Hacker

Recommended but not required:

  • Hard copy Dictionary and Thesaurus

Forecasted amount of time required to complete each week's lesson:

4-6 hours (In a regular school, you would have 6.7 hours of class time a week plus the time to do your homework. In a high school English class that could easily be 1-2 hours of homework a night. That's another 5-10 hours a week. This is for a one-semester English course, so divide the total 12-17 hours in half for a whole semester course and it would be 6-9 hours per week) So, if you are spending 4-6 hours each week on a lesson, you are doing great!

Description of student evaluations, quizzes, and tests:

There are four major grading periods, one after quarter. Exams and essays are weighted more heavily than regular assignments.

Additional activities:

Participation in the group discussions is mandatory and calculated as part of the course grade.


ENGLISH 10-2

Summary of course content and activities:

In English 10, the study of World Literature is used to examine structure and style (e.g. usage, diction, and character development) in writing, world view and Christian World view. This will include the study of a sampling of poetry, short stories, essays, plays and novels from various world backgrounds. We will be looking at the culture, the values, the assumptions, and contexts surrounding each of the pieces of literature. 

Some specific resources we use are Goodbye Marianne by Kirstein Watts, Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes, and The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho.

Philosophy statement for and/or behind teaching this course:

To many people literature is reading. Reading; however, is not literature: it is simply the process through which we experience literature. Literature is a gift from God. Through literature God enables man to communicate, not only his experiences but also his ideas, feelings, and beliefs. We should not merely read literature to escape from the world. Rather we should use literature as a vehicle to encounter the world. Literature can put us face to face with man in his world - man that acts both in ways pleasing to God and in ways displeasing to God. Literature can help us to know more about creation, our fellow man, God, and ourselves. Good literature causes us to think.

Pre-requisite(s):

Language Arts 9

Materials and resources provided by NSA, purchased by student, and/or recommended:

Provided by NSA:

  • Film Study: Fly Away Home
  • Goodbye Marianne 
  • The Alchemist
  • Various e-text readings provided with the lessons
  • A thesaurus ( online is ok)
  • English Language Arts Handbook for Students (available online)

Forecasted amount of time required to complete each week's lesson:

4-6 hours per week

Description of student evaluations, quizzes, and tests:

There are four major grading periods, one after quarter. Exams and essays are weighted more heavily than regular assignments.

Additional activities:

Participation in the group discussions is mandatory and calculated as part of the course grade.

ENGLISH 20

ENGLISH 20-1

Summary of course content and activities:

English 20 is a study of literature that begins with the writings of early Canadian poets and moves on up to some present day writers. This course presents a broad and varied array of authors and stories from the colonial years to the culturally turbulent years of the 1960's and 1970's. We also include some poets and writers from the 1800's. As we study literature, we will be looking at the culture, the values, the assumptions, and contexts surrounding each of the pieces of literature. With each lesson, we will first examine the author to learn more about his or her own background so that we can better understand and interpret his/her work. We study poetry, essays, short stories, and novels. Some specific resources we use are "Peace Shall Destroy Many" by Rudy Wiebe, "Death of a Salesman" by Arthur Miller and "The Merchant of Venice" by William Shakespeare.

Philosophy statement for and/or behind teaching this course:

To many people literature is reading. Reading; however, is not literature: it is simply the process through which we experience literature. Literature is a gift from God. Through literature God enables man to communicate, not only his experiences but also his ideas, feelings, and beliefs. We should not merely read literature to escape from the world. Rather we should use literature as a vehicle to encounter the world. Literature can put us face to face with man in his world - man that acts both in ways pleasing to God and in ways displeasing to God. Literature can help us to know more about creation, our fellow man, God, and ourselves. Good literature causes us to think.

Pre-requisite(s):

English 10-1

This is an academic course for the grade 11 student who:
•    Has successfully completed English 10 with at least a mark of 65%.
•    Is intending to graduate from NorthStar Academy, or any other high school, with an academic diploma
•    Is intending to pursue university, college, or vocational training upon graduation from high school.

Materials and resources provided by NSA, purchased by student, and/or recommended:

Provided by NSA:

  • Peace Shall Destroy Many by Rudy Wiebe
  • Smoke Signals DVD

Purchased by students

  • Hard copy Dictionary and Thesaurus

Forecasted amount of time required to complete each week's lesson:

6-7 hours - there is a lot of reading in this course, so students who are slower readers should expect to spend more time than this per lesson.

Description of student evaluations, quizzes, and tests:

  • Group Discussion, 5%
  • Course Work , 40%
  • Essays and projects, 30%
  • Final Exam, 20%
  • Total Course Mark = 100%

ENGLISH 20-2

Summary of course content and activities:

English 20 is a study of literature that begins with some early Canadian poets and moves on up to some present day writers. This course presents a broad and varied array of authors and stories. As we study literature, we will be looking at the culture, the values, the assumptions, and contexts surrounding each of the pieces of literature. With each lesson, we will first examine the author to learn more about his or her own background so that we can better understand and interpret his/her work. We study poetry, essays, short stories, and novels. Some specific resources we use are "The Hunger Games" by Suzanne Collins, "The Price of Freedom" by Simon Ivascu and Wesley Pop, and "The Merchant of Venice" by William Shakespeare. 

Pre-requisite(s):

English 10-1 or English 10-2

Materials and resources provided by NSA, purchased by student, and/or recommended:

PROVIDED BY NorthStar Academy

  • The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins
  • Non Fiction: The Price of Freedom

Forecasted amount of time required to complete each week's lesson:

6-7 hours per week

Description of student evaluations, quizzes, and tests:

  • Course Work, 35%
  • Essays, 30%
  • Midterm Exam, 15%
  • Final Exam,15%
  • Group Discussion, 5%
  • Total Course Mark = 100%

ENGLISH 30

ENGLISH 30-1

Summary of course content and activities:

In English 30, we study a variety of literary texts and respond personally and critically, developing our abilities to comprehend and understand the author's purpose and the choices he or she made in creating those works. We develop our own creative and analytical writing skills. Upon completion of this course, students will be prepared to write the Alberta diploma examination.

Pre-requisite(s):

English 20-1

Materials and resources provided by NSA, purchased by student, and/or recommended:

Provided by NSA:

  • Life is Beautiful DVD
  • Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
  • Hamlet by Shakespeare
  • Ghost Boy by Martin Pistorius

Forecasted amount of time required to complete each week's lesson:

7-8 hours per week

Description of student evaluations, quizzes and tests.

Student grades are calculated according to the following.

  • Participation: 5%
  • Assignments: 45%
  • Essays and projects: 50%
    (In-class exams will be included in the essays and projects category)

The classroom exam will comprise 70% of the students' grade for the course and the Provincial Final Exam Mark is 30% of the final mark.


ENGLISH 30-2

Summary of course content and activities:

In English 30-2, we study a variety of literary texts and respond personally and critically, developing our abilities to comprehend and understand the author’s purpose and the choices he or she made in creating those works. We develop our own creative and analytical writing skills. Short stories, poetry, film, and other forms of literature are studied. Upon completion of this course, students will be prepared to write the Alberta diploma examination.

Pre-requisite(s):

English 20-1 or English 20-2

Materials and resources provided by NSA, purchased by student, and/or recommended:

Provided by NSA:

  • Life is Beautiful DVD

Short stories, essays, and poetry are included in the lessons

  • "The Man-Eaters of Tsavo" - included in the lesson
  • Novel study choice of "The Outsiders" or "Tuesdays with Morrie" - included in the lesson

Forecasted amount of time required to complete each week's lesson:

6-7 hours

Description of student evaluations, quizzes and tests.

Student grades are calculated according to the following.

  • Weekly Assignments: 45%
  • Participation (Group Discussions): 5%
  • Essays and Projects: 25%
  • Midterm Exam: 15%
  • Final Exam: 10%
  • Total Course Mark    = 100%

MATH 10

MATH 10C

Summary of Course Content and Activities

Math 10 C is organized around 7 major topics.

  1. Measurement
  2. Trigonometry
  3. Factors and Products
  4. Roots and Powers
  5. Relations and Functions
  6. Linear Functions
  7. Systems of Linear Equations

Philosophy statement for teaching this course

The new math courses in Alberta have been developed to give students time to understand the big ideas of math, and not simply memorize formulas and algorithms. This is a challenge in an online enviroment, but concepts are presented as much as possible in a way that encourages students to think through the ideas themselves. Manipulatives are used where available and appropriate, and technology is integral in many lessons.

Prerequisites

A strong background in Math 9 or equivalent is recommended

Materials and Resources

Provided by NSA

  • eText covering all lesson concepts

Purchased by Students

  • Graphing calculator, TI83+ or 84+ is recommended for teacher support
  • Students will need a scanner for submitting work.

Forecasted amount of time required to complete each week's lesson

The class is organized around 18 weeks of lessons. Each week has 4 days of lessons and practice problems, and one test. For a student taking the course in one semester, this is ROUGHLY 8 hours of time working on math a week for 18 weeks. For a student taking the course over the entire year this is ROUGHLY 4 hours of time working on math each week for 36 weeks.

Description of student evaluations, quizzes and tests.

The entire course grade is made up of weekly tests. Tests can be rewritten with no restrictions. Weekly tests are always based 100% on the daily work students are doing.

MATH 10-3

Summary of Course Content and Activities

This course is designed to teach practical math skills. There are 5 components to this course, which are:

1. Measurement

2. Geometry

3. Numbers

4. Algebra

Prerequisites

Math 9

Materials and Resources

PROVIDED BY NSA

  • MathWorks 10 workbook

PROVIDED BY STUDENT

  • Calculator with the minimum of sine, cosine, tangent and exponent keys & a scanner for submitting work

Forecasted amount of time required to complete each week's lesson

The class is organized around 18 weeks of lessons. Each week has 4 days of lessons and practice problems. For a student taking the course in one semester, this is ROUGHLY 5-6 hours of time working on math a week for 18 weeks. For a student taking the course over the entire year this is ROUGHLY 2.5 - 3 hours of time working on math each week for 36 weeks.

Description of student evaluations, quizzes and tests.

Students are required to submit weekly lessons, as well as a variety of other tests, quizzes and activities. 

MATH 20

MATH 20-1

Summary of Course Content and Activities

Math 20-1 is made up of 7 Major Units with much of the time devoted to the study of functions in various forms.

  • Linear and Non-Linear Systems
  • Functions
  • Quadratic Functions
  • Polynomial Functions
  • Rational and other non-linear functions
  • Reasoning
  • Circle Geometry
  • Coordinate Geometry
  • Personal Finance

Philosophy statement for teaching this course

Students will develop an understanding of the concepts of this course through gentle repetition and practice with the big ideas. Graphing calculators are an integral part of the course, and many topics will be illustrated using technology in different forms. Since this is a"pure" math course, much emphasis is placed on theory and symbolic manipulation, though applications and"real life problems" are part of the course as well. Many of the problems that make up the course are multi-step and will require the student to make connections and pull ideas together to solve these tasks. Students must be able to follow through using both their knowledge of the question at hand as well as all the algebraic manipulation skills required to arrive at a solution.

Prerequisites

A strong background in Pure Math 10 or equivalent will be needed for a student to be sucessful in Math 20-1

Materials and Resources

Provided by NSA

  • Math 20-1 workbook and solution manual

Purchased by Students

  • Graphing Calculator, TI83+ or 84+ recommended if you wish teacher support for your calculator
  • Students will need a scanner for submitting work.

Forecasted amount of time required to complete each week's lesson

The class is organized around 18 weeks of lessons. Each week has 4 days of lessons and practice problems, and one test. For a student taking the course in one semester, this is ROUGHLY 8 hours of time working on math a week for 18 weeks. For a student taking the course over the entire year this is ROUGHLY 4 hours of time working on math each week for 36 weeks.

Description of student evaluations, quizzes and tests.

The entire course grade is made up of weekly tests. Tests can be rewritten with no restrictions. Weekly tests are always based 100% on the daily work students are doing.

MATH 20-2

Summary of Course Content and Activities

Major Course Goals• I can use proportional reasoning to solve problems• I can use quadratic functions to model real-world problems.• I can use quadratic equations to solve problems.  • I can identify appropriate mathematical operations for radical expressions• I can solve problems involving radical equations • I can use inductive and deductive reasoning to develop and analyze problem-solving strategies.• I can use reasoning to verify specific aspects of geometric designs. • I can solve triangle problems that do not involve right triangles.• I can analyze data and use it to solve problems.• I can determine the reliability of statistical claims.  
 Change forecasted amount of time required to complete each week’s lessons:  6 to 8 hours
 Description of Student Evaluation, Quizzes and Tests:  For semester courses, there are two major grading periods, while for full year courses there are four major grading periods, one after each quarter. Assignments will make up 50% of your final grade, participation and completion of group discussion postings another 10%, your Module assessment tasks 15% and finally tests and quizzes making up 20%. There will also be a final exam at the end of this course 15%

Materials and Resources

Provided by NSA

  • Principles of Math 11 Textbook

MATH 20-3

Summary of Course Content and Activities

This course is designed to teach practical math skills. There are 5 components to this course, which are:

1. Measurement

2. Geometry

3. Numbers

4. Algebra

5. Statistics

Prerequisites

Math 10C or Math 10-3

Materials and Resources

  • Calculator with the minimum of sine, cosine, tangent and exponent keys & a scanner for submitting work

Forecasted amount of time required to complete each week's lesson

The class is organized around 18 weeks of lessons. Each week has 4 days of lessons and practice problems. For a student taking the course in one semester, this is ROUGHLY 5-6 hours of time working on math a week for 18 weeks. For a student taking the course over the entire year this is ROUGHLY 2.5 - 3 hours of time working on math each week for 36 weeks.

Description of student evaluations, quizzes and tests.

Students are required to submit weekly lessons, as well as a variety of other tests, quizzes and activities. 

MATH 30

MATH 30-1

Summary of Course Content and Activities

Math 30-1 is made up of only 3 Major Units,br /> Much of the course is devoted to the study of functions in various forms.
This unit (Relations and Functions) depends completely on the foundation laid in Math 20-1.
Trigonometry also is based on prior knowledge from Math 20-1.
Permutations, Combinations and the Binomial Theorem is the last of the three units and is the only one that does not lean heavily on prior knowledge.

Philosophy statement for teaching this course

Students will develop an understanding of the concepts of this course through gentle repetition and practice with the big ideas.
Graphing calculators are an integral part of the course, and many topics will be illustrated using technology in different forms.
Since this is a "pure" math course, much emphasis is placed on theory and symbolic manipulation, though applications and "real life problems" are part of the course as well.

Many of the problems that make up the course are multi-step and will require the student to make connections and pull ideas together to solve these tasks. Students must be able to follow through using both their knowledge of the question at hand as well as all the algebraic manipulation skills required to arrive at a solution

Prerequisites

A STRONG background in Math 20-1 or equivalent will be needed for a student to be successful in Math 30-1

Materials and Resources

Provided by NSA

  • Pre-Calculus 12 Textbook

Purchased by Students

  • Graphing Calculator, TI83+ or 84+ recommended if you wish teacher support for your calculator
  • Students will need a scanner for submitting work.

Forecasted amount of time required to complete each week's lesson

The class is organized around 18 weeks of lessons. Each week has 4 days of lessons and practice problems, and one test. For a student taking the course in one semester, this is ROUGHLY 8 hours of time working on math a week for 18 weeks. For a student taking the course over the entire year this is ROUGHLY 4 hours of time working on math each week for 36 weeks.

Description of student evaluations, quizzes and tests.

The entire course grade is made up of weekly tests. Tests can be rewritten with no restrictions. Weekly tests are always based 100% on the daily work students are doing.


MATH 30-2

Summary of Course Content and Activities

Mathematics 30-2 is the second course in the -2 course sequence (following Mathematics 20-2) and is intended to provide students with the mathematical understandings and critical thinking skills needed for post-secondary studies that DO NOT require the study of calculus.

Topics include: Logic and Set Theory, Probability, Permutations, Combinations, and the Fundamental Counting Principle, Polynomials, Rational Expressions, Sinusoidal Functions and finally, Exponents and Logarithms
 

Philosophy statement for teaching this course

Math exists because God created the universe stable and constant with clear patterns and relationships that do not change.  As students study mathematics, it should point them towards the Creator."The chief aim of all investigations of the external world should be to discover the rational order and harmony which has been imposed on it by God and which He revealed to us in the language of mathematics."  - from Johannes Kepler Mystery of the Cosmos (1956)
Relating the study of mathematics to what the learners already know, deem personally useful and consider relevant, fasciliates learning.  This course presents (as often as possible) its learning objectives from a  base of concrete experiences and from a solid Biblical perspective.  The study of Mathematics will promote higher level thinking and problem solving along side both creativity and imagination.
 

Major Course Goals

  • I can use reasoning, set theory and graphic organizers to analyze and solve both games and puzzles.  
  • I can interpret, assess and solve probability problems.
  • I can use counting methods to solve problems involving permutations and combinations.
  • I can use polynomial functions be use to model problems.  
  • I can explain how rational expressions and extension of rational numbers.
  • I can use rational expressions and rational equations to model and solve real-world problems.  
  • I can use sinusoidal functions to model and solve cyclical problems.
  • I can use exponents and logarithms to solve problems that involve growth and decay.  
     Change forecasted amount of time required to complete each week’s lessons:  about 8 hours

Materials and Resources

Provided by NSA

  • Principles of Math 12 textbook

 

Description of Student Evaluation, Quizzes and Tests:  

For semester courses, there are two major grading periods, while for full year courses there are four major grading periods, one after each quarter. Assignments will make up 40% of your classroom grade, participation and completion of group discussion postings another 10%, your Module assessment tasks 25% and finally tests and quizzes making up 25%. 

Please note:  There will be a diploma exam at the end of this course, therefore your final mark will be assigned as follows:     

Final Mark = 70% School Awarded Mark + 30% Diploma Exam Mark


MATH 31

Summary of Course Content and Activities

Mathematics 31 is an introduction to calculus(the fun math). The Math 31 course is designed to introduce you to the mathematical methods of calculus.  The course acts as a link between the outcomes of Math 10-20-30 programs and the requirements of the mathematics encountered in post-secondary study.  Calculus is the mathematics of CHANGE.  The focus of the course is to examine functions that describe changing situations as opposed to more static situations encountered in previous mathematics.

Prerequisites

A STRONG background in Math 30-1 will be needed for a student to be successful in Math 31.

Materials and Resources

Provided by NSA

  • Calculus: A first Course Textbook

Purchased by Students

  • Graphing Calculator, TI83+ or 84+ recommended if you wish teacher support for your calculator
  • Students will need a scanner for submitting work.

Forecasted amount of time required to complete each week's lesson

The class is organized around 18 weeks of lessons. Each week has 4 days of lessons and practice problems, and one test. For a student taking the course in one semester, this is ROUGHLY 8 hours of time working on math a week for 18 weeks. For a student taking the course over the entire year this is ROUGHLY 4 hours of time working on math each week for 36 weeks.

Credits: 5

SOCIAL STUDIES 10

SOCIAL STUDIES 10-1

Summary of Course Content and Activities

The focus of Social Studies 10-1 is on globalization. We study the development of globalization and its historical impact on indigenous people groups, as well as current issues of sustainability. We also look at how globalization affects identity and citizenship and use this information to give students the power to choose what they will allow to form their identities.

Students complete a variety of activities and assignments including videos, multiple choice tests, written responses, unit projects, participating in forums and exploring current events.

Philosophy statement for teaching this course

The purpose of Social Studies 10-1 is to expand students' thinking about what affects them by studying local to national to international issues. By investigating these issues, and developing biblical positions on global issues, students will be able to better evaluate events and issues locally and around the world and be a positive influence in the world.

Prerequisites

Social Studies 9, with a final grade of 60% or higher

Materials and Resources

Provided by NSA

  • Textbook: Perspectives on Globalization

Purchased by Students

  • Internet access, Adobe Reader, Microsoft Office 2013 or newer,
  • Bible
  • dictionary, thesaurus
  • atlas

(Bible, dictionary, thesaurus and atlas can be found for free on-line)

Forecasted amount of time required to complete each week's lesson

6-8 hours

Description of student evaluations, quizzes and tests.

There are 18 lessons, corresponding to 18 weeks in a semester. Assessment in Social Studies 10-1 includes both formative and summative assessment. Formative assessments include learning activities such as a learning log, forum discussions, chapter worksheets, exit slips and other learning activities. Summative assessments are worth most of the course mark and include unit projects, multiple choice unit tests and some forums or weekly assignments/projects.

SOCIAL STUDIES 10-2

Summary of Course Content and Activities

The purpose of Social Studies 10-2 is to expand students' thinking about what affects them by studying local to national to international issues. By investigating these issues, and developing biblical positions on global issues, students will be able to better evaluate events and issues locally and around the world and be a positive influence in the world.

Prerequisites

Social Studies 9

Materials and Resources

Provided by NSA

  • Textbook: Living in a Globalizing World

Forecasted amount of time required to complete each week's lesson

6-8 hours

Description of student evaluations, quizzes and tests.

There are 18 lessons which correspond to 18 weeks in each semester. Students complete weekly assignments, Unit projects and Unit tests.

SOCIAL STUDIES 20

SOCIAL STUDIES 20-1

Summary of Course Content and Activities

The focus of Social Studies 20-1 is nationalism. We start by exploring understandings of nationalism and the extent to which nation affects identity. We then investigate and evaluate the pursuit of national interest and the pursuit of internationalism. We finish the course with exploring Canadian identity and how it has evolved, as well as discussing the Canada we want to see and what our roles might be in promoting those visions of Canada.

Philosophy statement for teaching this course

The exploration of nation has largely been a study of the relationship of individuals and citizens with the state, yet the understanding of nation has broadened to encompass ethic, linguistic and other understandings of nation. By studying contemporary understandings of nation and the complexities of relationships between individuals and their nation(s) and the relationships between nations students will gain a greater understanding and appreciation of complex issues in today's world and develop personal responses to those issues.

Prerequisites

Social Studies 10-1 with a mark of 60% or higher.

Materials and Resources

Provided by NSA

  • Textbook: Exploring Nationalism

Purchased by Students

  • Internet access
  • Adobe Reader, Microsoft Office 2003 or newer
  • Bible
  • dictionary, thesaurus
  • atlas

(Bible, dictionary, thesaurus and atlas can be found for free on-line)

Forecasted amount of time required to complete each week's lesson

6-8 hours per week

Description of student evaluations, quizzes and tests.

Social Studies 20-1 consists of 18 lessons that correspond to 18 weeks in a semester. Assessment is based on weekly assignments, unit tests and unit projects.

SOCIAL STUDIES 20-2

Summary of Course Content and Activities

The focus of Social Studies 20-2 is nationalism. We start by learning understandings of nationalism and discussing the extent to which nation affects identity. We then investigate the pursuit of national interest and the pursuit of internationalism. We finish the course with exploring Canadian identity and how it has evolved, as well as discussing the Canada we want to see and what our roles might be in promoting those visions of Canada.

Philosophy statement for teaching this course

The exploration of nation has largely been a study of the relationship of individuals and citizens with the state, yet the understanding of nation has broadened to encompass ethic, linguistic and other understandings of nation. By studying contemporary understandings of nation and the complexities of relationships between individuals and their nation(s) and the relationships between nations students will gain a greater understanding and appreciation of complex issues in today's world and develop personal responses to those issues.

Prerequisites

Social studies 10-1 or Social studies 10-2 with a mark of 50% or higher

Materials and Resources

Provided by NSA

  • Textbook: Understanding Nationalism

Purchased by Students

  • Internet access
  • Adobe Reader, Microsoft Office 2003 or newer
  • Bible
  • dictionary, thesaurus
  • atlas

(Bible, dictionary, thesaurus and atlas can be found for free on-line)

Forecasted amount of time required to complete each week's lesson

6-8 hours

Description of student evaluations, quizzes and tests.

Social Studies 20-2 consists of 18 lessons that correspond to 18 weeks in a semester. Assessment is based on weekly assignments, unit tests and unit projects.

SOCIAL STUDIES 30

SOCIAL STUDIES 30-1

Summary of Course Content and Activities

In Social Studies 30-1, we explore a variety of ideologies. We begin with introducing individualism and collectivism as these are the basis of many ideologies. We then investigate the development of liberalism from classical liberalism to modern liberalism and its influence in today's societies. We also explore various ideologies that developed in response to liberalism as we evaluate the extent to which liberalism is a viable or desireable ideology for today's world. Throughout this course, we compare various ideologies and ways of thinking with biblical ideology in order to ground students with a firm foundation in truth about how our world works. Preparation for the diploma exams is developed throughout the entire course, with many opportunities to practice both Written Response and multiple choice questions.

Philosophy statement for teaching this course

Because the principles of liberalism have played a significant role in the development of modern democratic societies, understanding the development of liberalism as well as challenges that have arisen in response to liberalism will give students a greater understanding of why our governments and societies are the way they are. By exploring the strengths and weaknesses of liberalism as well as the extent to which liberal principles are consistent with biblical values, students will gain the thinking skills to become active, informed and responsible citizens.

Prerequisites

Social Studies 20-1 with a mark of 60% or higher

Materials and Resources

Provided by NSA

  • Textbook: Perspectives on Ideology

Purchased by Students

  • Internet access,

  • Adobe Reader, Microsoft Office 2003 or newer,

  • Bible,

  • dictionary, thesaurus,

  • atlas

(Bible, dictionary, thesaurus and atlas can be found for free on-line)

Forecasted amount of time required to complete each week's lesson

6-8 hours

Description of student evaluations, quizzes and tests.

There are 18 lessons, corresponding to 18 weeks in a semester. Assessment in Social Studies 30-1 includes both formative and summative assessment. Formative assessments include learning activities such as a learning log, forum discussions, chapter worksheets, exit slips and other learning activities. Summative assessments are worth most of the course mark and include bigger projects, multiple choice unit tests, written response assignments and some forums or weekly assignments/projects.

SOCIAL STUDIES 30-2

Summary of Course Content and Activities

In Social Studies 30-2, we explore various ideologies in relation to the principles of liberalism. We begin with introducing individualism and collectivism as these are the basis of many ideologies. We then investigate the development of liberalism from classical liberalism to modern liberalism and its influence in today's societies. We also explore various ideologies that developed in response to liberalism as we evaluate the extent to which liberalism is a viable or desireable ideology for today's world. Throughout this course, we compare various ideologies and ways of thinking with biblical ideology in order to ground students with a firm foundation in truth about how our world works. Preparation for the diploma exams is developed throughout the entire course, with practice exam questions in the last lessons.

Philosophy statement for teaching this course

Because the principles of liberalism have played a significant role in the development of modern democratic societies, understanding the development of liberalism as well as challenges that have arisen in response to liberalism will give students a greater understanding of why our governments and societies are the way they are. By exploring the strengths and weaknesses of liberalism as well as the extent to which liberal principles are consistent with biblical values, students will gain the thinking skills to become active, informed and responsible citizens.

Prerequisites

Social Studies 20-1 or Social Studies 20-2 with a mark of 50% or higher.

Materials and Resources

Provided by NSA

  • Textbook: Understandings of Ideologies

Forecasted amount of time required to complete each week's lesson

6-8 hours per week

Description of student evaluations, quizzes and tests.

Social Studies 30-2 consists of 18 lessons that correspond to 18 weeks in a semester. Diploma practice is woven throughout the course. Students complete weekly assignments as well as some projects and unit tests.

SCIENCE 10

Summary of Course Content and Activities

Science 10 is a brief look into 4 sciences: chemistry, biology, physics and earth science.
Activities include: reading, practice problems, quizzes, tests and virtual labs.

Philosophy statement for teaching this course

Science 10 provides the foundation in science that creates opportunities for them to pursue progressively higher levels of study, prepares them for science-related occupations. Students are introduced to the physical, biological, and chemical components of science. Science 10 provides students with opportunities to explore, analyze and appreciate the interrelationships among science, technology, society and the environment, and to develop understandings that will affect their personal lives, their careers and their futures.

Prerequisites

A mark of 50% or better in Science 9

Materials and Resources

Provided by NSA

  • Addison Wesley Science 10 by Pearson

Purchased by Students

  • A scientific calculator is required for this course.
  • notebook for pencil and paper assignments.

Forecasted amount of time required to complete each week's lesson

7-8 hours per week

Description of student evaluations, quizzes and tests.

  • For each unit Assignments 60%
  • Quizzes 10%
  • Tests 30%

The units are worth 70% of your final mark and the Final Exam is 30%

CHEMISTRY

CHEMISTRY 20

Summary of course content and activities:

Course Topics:

  • Unit 1: Matter as Solutions, Acids, Bases and Gases, Chapters 1-6
  • Unit 2: Quantitative Relationships in Chemical Changes, Chapter 7
  • Unit 3: Chemical Bonding in Matter, Chapter 8
  • Unit 4: The Diversity of Matter: An Intro to Organic Chemistry, Chapter 9

Philosophy statement for and/or behind teaching this course:

Chemistry is the study of matter and its changes. Through the study of chemistry, you are given an opportunity to explore and understand the natural world and to become aware of the profound influence of chemistry in your everyday life.

Pre-requisite(s):

A mark of 50% or better in Science 10

Number of credits that this course is worth:

5 credits

Materials and resources provided by NSA, purchased by student, and/or recommended:

Provided by NSA:

  • Nelson Chemistry by F. Jenkins et al., 1993

Purchased by student:

  • A scientific calculator is required for this course.

Recommended but not required:

  • Optional: Molecular Model Set

Forecasted amount of time required to complete each week's lesson

7-8 hours per week

Description of student evaluations, quizzes and tests.

  • For each unit: Unit Work 70%
    • Unit Exam 30%
    • Overall: Course work 60%
    • Midterm 10%
  • Final exam 30%

CHEMISTRY 30

Summary of Course Content and Activities

In Chemistry 30 we study change--changes in thermochemical energy, elerctrochemical systems and in acid and base equilibrium. We also study hydrocarbons--their sources, how to name them and simple reactions with them.
Activities include: reading, practice problems, quizzes, tests and virtual labs.

Philosophy statement for teaching this course

Chemistry is a discovery about how and why elements interact and combine in the world. As Christians, we have been created to ?rule?over the all the earth? (Genesis 1:26). We can serve God more effectively as His caretakers when we learn about His creation and the rules that govern it.

Prerequisites

A mark of 50% or better (65% or better recommended) in Chemistry 20

Materials and Resources

Provided by NSA

  • Nelson Chemistry by F. Jenkins et al., 2007a

Purchased by Students

  • A scientific calculator is required for this course.
  • Optional: Molecular Model Set
  • notebook for pencil and paper assignments.

Forecasted amount of time required to complete each week's lesson

8-10 hours per week

Description of student evaluations, quizzes and tests.

In Class Work

  • Assignments 35%
  • Exams 15%
  • Diploma Exam 50%

PHYSICS

PHYSICS 20

Summary of Course Content and Activities

Physics 20 is the first course in the Physics 20-30 sequence.
This course includes the following strands:

  •     Kinematics: the science of motion
  •     Dynamics: the study of forces and the cause of motion
  •     Circular Motion, Work and Energy
  •     Oscillatory Motion and Mechanical Waves

Philosophy statement for teaching this course

Physics is the study of both matter and energy, as well as their interactions. Through its study learners are given opportunities to both explore and comprehend the natural world as God created it. They are also given opportunities to make themselves aware of the profound influence Physics has on self, society and the environment.

Understanding that learning proceeds best when it originates from a base of what the learner already knows, deems personally useful and considered relevant, this course presents (as often as possible) its learning objectives from a base of concrete experiences and from a solid Biblical perspective. As an experimental discipline, the study of Physics will promote higher level thinking and problem solving alongside both creativity and imagination.

Students taking Physics 20 are presumed to have reached the acceptable standard or better in both Science 10 and Mathematics 10.

Materials and Resources

Provided by NSA

  • Pearson Physics

Purchased by Students

  • Microsoft Office 97 (or greater) especially Word and Excel
  • Scientific Calculator (or approved graphing calculator)
  • Bible

Forecasted amount of time required to complete each week's lesson

Semester students can expect to complete the course in about 8 hours per week over eighteen weeks. Full year students will complete the course in about 4 hours per week over thirty-six weeks.

Description of student evaluations, quizzes and tests.

For semester courses, there are two major grading periods, while for full year courses there are four major grading periods, one after each quarter.

There are four major grading periods, one after each quarter. Assignment Check-ins will make up 30% of your final grade, completion of the group discussions and the self-check
assignments another 10%, your Reflections and Take Away Journal responses 30%, and finally tests and quizzes making up 15%.


There will also be a final exam at the end of this course that will
make up the last 15% of your final course grade.

PHYSICS 30

Summary of Course Content and Activities

Physics 30 is the second course in the Physics 20-30 sequence.
This course includes the following strands:

  • Momentum and Impulse: A look at the movement of objects both before and after a collision.
  • Forces and Fields: The study of both electric and magnetic forces and fields.
  • Electromagnetic Radiation: A look at light, its properties and theories behind it, both past and present. This unit will include an introduction to Quantum Mechanics
  • Atomic Physics: The exploration of the atom and its particles.

Philosophy statement for teaching this course

Physics is the study of both matter and energy, as well as their interactions. Through its study learners are given opportunities to both explore and comprehend the natural world as God created it. They are also given opportunities to make themselves aware of the profound influence Physics has on self, society and the environment.

Understanding that learning proceeds best when it originates from a base of what the learner already knows, deems personally useful and considered relevant, this course presents (as often as possible) its learning objectives from a base of concrete experiences and from a solid Biblical perspective. As an experimental discipline, the study of Physics will promote higher level thinking and problem solving alongside both creativity and imagination.

Prerequisites

Students taking Physics 30 are presumed to have reached the acceptable standard or better in both Physics 20 and Mathematics 20.

Materials and Resources

Provided by NSA

  • Pearson Physics

Purchased by Students

  • Microsoft Office 97 (or greater) especially Word and Excel
  • Scientific Calculator (or approved graphing calculator)
  • Bible
  • Optional: The Key - Physics 30

Forecasted amount of time required to complete each week's lesson

Semester students can expect to complete the course in about 8 hours per week over eighteen weeks. Full year students will complete the course in about 4 hours per week over thirty-six weeks.

Description of student evaluations, quizzes and tests.

For semester courses, there are two major grading periods, while for full year courses there are four major grading periods, one after each quarter.

Assignment check-ins will make up 35% of your final grade, completion of the group discussions and self-check assignments another 10%, your Equations are Guides to Thinking Journal 35% and finally, tests and quizzes make up the last 20%.

Please note: There will be a diploma exam at the end of this course, therefore your final mark will be assigned as follows - Final Mark = 70% School Awarded Mark + 30% Diploma Exam Mark

BIOLOGY

BIOLOGY 20

Summary of Course Content and Activities

Biology 20 is the first course in the Biology 20-30 sequence.

This course includes the following strands:

  • Energy and Matter Exchange in the Biosphere: An exploration of Earth's cycles and nature's dependence on them.
  • Ecosystems and Population Change: Including a study of the Creation/Evolution debate.
  • Photosynthesis and Cellular Respiration: A indepth look at the processes of energy production in plants, animals and humans.
  • Human Systems: A study of the digestive, respiratory, excretory and circulatory systems.

Students will also participate in a on-line, virtual pig dissection.

Philosophy statement for teaching this course

Biology is the study of life and living systems from the molecular level to the biosphere. Through the study of Biology learners are given an opportunity to explore and understand the natural world that God created. They are made aware of the profound influence of Biology in their lives. Relating the study of Biology to what the learners already know, deem personally useful and consider relevant, facitilitates learning. Learning proceeds best when it originates from a base of concrete experiences that present an authentic view of Biology within the larger context of science and technology. In Biology 20-30, students learn Biology in relevant contexts and are encouraged to engage in its content from a Biblical perspective. Students are also encouraged to appreciate it as a scientific endeavor with practical impacts not only on their own lives, but also on the larger contexts of society, environment and economy.

Prerequisites

Students taking Biology 20 are presumed to have reached the acceptable standard or better in Science 10.

Materials and Resources

Provided by NSA

  • Nelson Biology: Alberta 20 - 30
  • Access to Nelson's Student Web Centre

Purchased by Students

  • Microsoft Office 97 (or greater) especially Word and Excel
  • Scientific Calculator (approved graphing calculator is acceptable)
  • Bible

Forecasted amount of time required to complete each week's lesson

Semester students can expect to complete the course in about 6 hours per week over eighteen weeks. Full year students will complete the course in about 3 hours per week over thirty-six weeks.

Description of student evaluations, quizzes and tests.

For semester courses, there are two major grading periods, while for full year courses there are four major grading periods, one after each quarter. Assignments will make up 35% of your final grade, participation in group discussions another 10%, your I Can Objective Journal 20% and finally tests and quizzes making up 20%.
There will also be a final exam at the end of this course that will make up the last 15% of your final course grade.

BIOLOGY 30

Summary of Course Content and Activities

Biology 30 is the second course in the Biology 20-30 sequence.
This course includes the following strands:

  • The Nervous and Endocrine Systems: A look at both their structure and fuction, especially as they help to maintain equilibrium.
  • Reproduction and Development: A study of both hormone control and pregnancy.
  • Cell Division, Genetics and Molecular Biology: A detailed study of the processes involved in genetic inheritance.
  • Populaiton and Community Dynamics: A look at the factors influencing gene pool and population composition.

Philosophy statement for teaching this course

Biology is the study of life and living systems from the molecular level to the biosphere. Through the study of Biology learners are given an opportunity to explore and understand the natural world that God created. They are made aware of the profound influence of Biology in their lives. Relating the study of Biology to what the learners already know, deem personally useful and consider relevant, facitilitates learning. Learning proceeds best when it originates from a base of concrete experiences that present an authentic view of Biology within the larger context of science and technology. In Biology 20-30, students learn Biology in relevant contexts and are encouraged to engage in its content from a Biblical perspective. Students are also encouraged to appreciate it as a scientific endeavor with practical impacts not only on their own lives, but also on the larger contexts of society, environment and economy.

Prerequisites

Students taking Biology 30 are presumed to have reached the acceptable standard or better in Biology 20.

Materials and Resources

Provided by NSA

  • Nelson Biology: Alberta 20 - 30
  • Access to Nelson's Student Web Centre

Purchased by Students

  • Microsoft Office 97 (or greater) especially Word and Excel
  • Scientific Calculator (approved graphing calculator is acceptable)
  • Bible

Forecasted amount of time required to complete each week's lesson

Semester students can expect to complete the course in about 8 hours per week over eighteen weeks. Full year students will complete the course in about 4 hours per week over thirty-six weeks.

Description of student evaluations, quizzes and tests.

For semester courses, there are two major grading periods, while for full year courses there are four major grading periods, one after each quarter. Assignments will make up 30% of your final grade, participation in group discussions another 10%, your I Can Objective Journal 30% with tests and quizzes making up the last 30%.
Please note: There will be a diploma exam at the end of this course, therefore your final mark will be assigned as follows -
Final Mark = 50% School Awarded Mark + 50% Diploma Exam Mark

RELIGIOUS STUDIES 15

Summary of Course Content and Activities

Religious Studies 15 is a 5-credit course. The content covers the 39 books of the Old Testament in the light of Jesus the Messiah. The student will be expected to work through weekly lessons. While there is quite a lot of reading involved, the assignments are easy to follow and often require students to answer questions critically using evidence to support their views.

Prerequisites

No prerequisite

Materials and Resources

Students are responsible for purchasing their own Bible or using an online/digital version. 

Forecasted amount of time required to complete each week's lesson

3-5 hours

Description of student evaluations, quizzes and tests.

There are assignments and one final project/essay.

RELIGIOUS STUDIES 25

Summary Course Content and Activities:

Religious Studies 25 is a 5-credit course. The content covers the New Testament in the light of Jesus the Messiah. The student will be expected to work through weekly lessons. While there is quite a lot of reading involved, the assignments are easy to follow and often require students to answer questions critically using evidence to support their views.

Pre-requisite(s):

None. Religious Studies 15 preferred

Materials and resources provided by NSA, purchased by student, and/or recommended:

  • Students are responsible for purchasing their own Bible or using an online/digital version.

Forecasted amount of time required to complete each week’s lesson:

4-6 hours

Description of student evaluations, quizzes and tests:

There are assignments and one final project/essay.

RELIGIOUS STUDIES 35

Summary Course Content and Activities:

Religious Studies 35 is a 5 credit course. The Biblical Christian worldview is presented in contrast to the humanist worldviews of Secular Humanism, Marxism/Leninism, and Cosmic Humanism. The course surveys ten essential areas of study: Theology, Philosophy, Ethics, Biology, Psychology, Sociology, Law, Politics, Economics, and History.

Philosophy statement for and/or behind teaching this course:

The intent of this course is to lay a foundation of understanding that provides a basis for the student’s own personal worldview. The supremacy of Christ and the Christian worldview is presented as the point of integration for all areas of knowledge. Students will become increasingly aware of the lost condition of those without Christ and will be better equipped to communicate God’s truth.

Pre-requisite(s):

None. Religious Studies 15 & 25 are preferred.

Materials and resources provided by NSA, purchased by student, and/or recommended:

  • Students are responsible for purchasing their own Bible or using an online/digital version.

Forecasted amount of time required to complete each week’s lesson:

5-7 hours

Description of student evaluations, quizzes and tests:

There are assignments and one final project/essay.